Teaching “German” in 2022

In about an hour, I’ll begin teaching first-semester German for the first time in almost a decade. As a Department Head, you usually get to choose what it is you want to teach, because you make the schedule. This often means that Department Heads teach graduate seminars or high-profile lecture courses, but seldom language courses at the first- and second-year level. But I couldn’t see how I was supposed to develop policy, programming, and curriculum in our language program for the future without actually teaching in it. So here we go. 30 students are enrolled! As an instructor, I’m coordinated by one of my colleagues, Prof. Angelika Struch, who for years has managed the logistics and development of these multi-section courses, and it’s going to be a bit of a challenge for me to do as I’m told, stick with the program, and be a good team-member. But it’s a good and necessary challenge! Will report back on how we do. But, I can tell you that we’ll be starting at the very beginning with the following Indigenous Land Acknowledgement:

Die UBC Vancouver befindet sich auf dem traditionellen angestammten und nicht abgetretenen Territorium des xwməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam) Volkes. Das Land, auf dem der Campus liegt, war immer und ist bis heute ein Ort des Lernens für die Musqueam, die hier über Jahrtausende ihre Kultur, Geschichte und Traditionen von einer Generation zur nächsten weitergegeben haben.

UBC’s Point Grey Campus is located on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the xwməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam) people. The land it is situated on has always been a place of learning for the Musqueam people, who for millennia have passed on their culture, history, and traditions from one generation to the next on this site.

Hi, friend(s)!

Life is getting longer and more complex than I expected, and it seems I really do need a place to pull it all together, just in case something happens. Here, on this site, I intend to share things that I’ve worked on alone or with others, going back 15 years at least, both scholarly and otherwise. The site is meant for friends, family, strangers—everyone. I’ll do my best to keep it updated, accurate, and useful. Please feel free to make suggestions and observations, as they occur to you.

The photo above is one I took of the ‘black hill’ that gives Tucson its name in Tohono O’odham language, as seen through a wheatpasted west-facing window from the Immaculate Heart Academy off of South Sixth Avenue, where I once lived. You probably know that I have a genetic visual condition called ocular albinism that makes things fuzzy in the distance, but also sometimes intensely beautiful. If you’re more than 15 feet away from me at any given moment, it’s possible you look something along those lines.

This Web site is composed on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the xwməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam) people, who for millennia have passed on their culture, history, and traditions from one generation to the next here in this place, which many currently call Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.